Parliamentary Crisis in Cartoons

The deadlock on election of speaker for lower house (Wolesi Jirga) turned into another ridiculous show today (Wednesday) when the Parliamentary Commission set up to recommend ways for solution of the standoff ended with fighting of words and punches among MPs. Pajhwok has the report here. After five rounds of failed attempts to elect the speaker of the house, a special commission was set to either suggest changes in the regulations of the speaker election, or recommend other solutions. Already the commission had asked for two more days, on Monday, when they were supposed to present their recommendations in the house. But today, the standoff entered another bitter scenario of MPs punching each other.

After weeks of conflict on parliament inauguration blocked by President Karzai, now it seems the MPs, who took a strong united stance against Karzai for the inauguration postponement, are now unable to continue the process. What is the problem? Why they can’t go on with a simple election of a speaker? The answer is known by all, but it is not discussed openly, rather shown by actions, as today when two women MPs started punching each other after Nasima made comments regarding the inter-ethnic bitter accusations of civil war era. The real problems are on ethnic, tribal, linguistic, regional and sectarian lines. This is the most serious problem of Afghanistan with its nation-building, and function of governance institutions. Insurgency, corruption and lack of capacity can all have solutions, but the issue which will keep Afghanistan a crumbling failed state will be the ethnic and tribal rifts in politics. These same factors have been the reasons why Afghanistan never became a stable functioning and successful nation-state in its history. Unless the society comes to a stage where all population is educated and understand the need to compromise the conflicts throughout our history and find a “new way” of going ahead, we can’t hope Afghanistan on the path of stability and a properly functioning democratic state.  I will write further about the “new way” later. Right now i wanted to share with the readers of this blog some cartoons about the parliamentary crisis by Khaliq Alizada, a famous Afghan cartoonist of the Daily Outlook Afghanistan. His works appear on Outlook and Daily Afghanistan (Dari and English papers) everyday. In recent weeks, he had several cartoons about the parliamentary crisis.

 

The banner reads “Independent Election Commission”, the box resembling ballot box and IEC building, which has been locked. This cartoon came the day when Attorney General’s Office raided IEC building with police and seized the ballot boxes on Feb 14.

 

 

“Ouch!” says the guy on the chair, where the text on its side reads “Speaker of Lower House”, and the text on the black-hand that pulls the chair reads “Government elements” referring the speaker-election standoff in lower house, which is partly a Karzai game.

This cartoon is a mockery of the blank votes by MPs during the rounds of election for speaker of the lower house. The sign above reads “Shurai Milli/Lower house”. The guy with white coat is an MP asking “should it be white or black” in response to the offer of money. We say “white vote” for the blank votes. Horse-trading is common in Afghanistan, when MPs are bribed to vote as demanded by the bribing parties, most of the times the Government.

This one is hilarious. The number-plate in front of the vehicle reads “New parliament” and the guy is saying “Its punctured, doesn’t work!”. This cartoon came after the failure of MPs to elect speaker for 4rth round of nominations in lower house.

 

The guy sitting on the edge has a banner hanging on its feet which reads “the winner candidates” of the lower house, saying to the hand “Government” that holds it “Ouch…ouch…don’t shake too much, feeling pain in lungs”. This cartoon is about the Special Court and Attorney General warnings to the winner candidates about cases of fraud in polls and the Government dodging them with parliament inauguration.

The direction sign reads “Parliament inauguration”. The man crying depicts President Karzai asked by the guy “loser candidates” saying “Don’t Go, Mr. President” to the inauguration of the lower house, which President Karzai was compelled to inaugurate after winning candidates warned to go on without him (Next cartoon). The loser candidates were on a 48-hours sit-in strike in the Presidential Palace asking Karzai not to inaugurate the parliament. Karzai in the cartoon says, “I swear to God, i am also not happy with this”.

Text on the vehicle reads “Second term of lower house/Wolesi Jirga” and the driver, depicting Karzai with his typical Afghan national dress and hat, holding the banner which reads “Departure Date; January 26”. The guys riding behind are MPs saying “will you move or…” holding a stick!, referring to the warning of MPs to start the lower house without Karzai’s official inauguration, which has been shown by depicting Karzai as a “driver” of this vehicle.

This cartoon is about the Tom and Jerry game for some days between police and the former MPs who were insisting to enter the parliament building after the term of the house had ended. Heavy police was deployed to avoid their entry. The guy with a flag reads “formers members of lower house” and the police with stick says, “Don’t bother anymore…” The building behind is the “Shurai Milli or Lower House”.

This cartoon is about the fight between Attorney General’s office and Independent Elections Commission on announcement of election results. When the IEC announced election results of lower house, the Attorney General’s office warned them not to do. The button which is “on” is of the election results and the guy in white coat is “Attorney General” saying “turn it off” (the election results) and the guy with stick is “Independent Election Commission” saying “if you have the gut, touch it!”. Literally it reads “if you are male, touch it!”, which is an expression to say “if you have the gut”.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Afghan Media, Parliament, Parliamentary Elections 2010

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s